Video Coach Demelza Marie Explains Creating Engaging Videos for Online Courses

April 19, 2021

In today’s episode, we have Demelza Marie with us and she is going to talk about how course creators can make more engaging videos for your students.

You will also get to hear the most important steps when creating any piece of content, how to show authenticity when recording your videos, and some great tips on the type of equipment you need to get started.

Website: DemelzaMarie.com
YouTube: DemelzaMarie
Facebook: demelzamarieJ
Instagram: demelza.marie

Notes

In this episode, you will hear...

… Demelza’s background in how she got start in video production and was able to travel while producing videos for others.

… how a change in Demelza’s health became a pathway into working from home and starting in online course creation.

… why you should think about the ideas that come naturally to you when picking a course topic to teach.

… the reason why Demelza believes creating a course before building your audience is the wrong way to go about it.

… how being everywhere can be counter-productive to getting your name out there when creating content.

… the strategy she uses to grow a YouTube following which drives traffic back to her online courses.

… how Demelza uses opt-ins to create a know, like, and trust factor with her audience.

… awesome gamification strategies Demelza uses in her lead magnets and courses to help drive engagement in her business.

… the importance of not being a perfectionist when you are creating your online courses.

… why being authentic and giving value is more important than the highly produced quality of an online course.

… some simple tricks to increase the quality of your videos and have more confidence while talking on camera.

… how doing Facebook lives can help you practice at being better in videos for your online courses.

… Demelza’s recommendations for video, audio, and lighting equipment when creating an online course.

… an expert tip for professionals that makes it so you can see your desktop on a teleprompter when doing live video.

… Demelza’s top two tips for course creators so that you start off on the right track and not waste a lot of time and money.

Resources

Transcript

Jeremy Deighan
Hey everyone, thank you for checking out the podcast today. We have video coach Demelza Marie with us today, who is going to talk about how we can create better videos for our courses and for our content. And I've been following her for some time. I'm in her group, and I've been seeing some of the things that she's been putting out. And I just think this is gonna be a great episode. I'm glad to have you. How are you doing today?

Demelza Marie
Thanks so much. I'm doing great. Thank you.

Jeremy Deighan
Very good. I'm excited to have you on. I been checking out your group and your content and your website, and you are just producing really good stuff. And I think this will be a great episode to help out people who need help with their video, which is, you know, very important being online course creators, of course.

We can make courses in different ways with text and audio, but the most common is video. And a lot of people struggle with the technical and the setting it up and just how to get better videos and so forth. And so I'm excited to dive right in. But before we do that, why don't you just take a moment and let us know, what were you doing before you got into online business and online courses?

Demelza Marie
Well, um, if I go back a ways, I graduated from university actually studying film and video production. So I entered in film competitions, or video competitions, and I won one of those, or a couple of those actually. And went through the university and after that I was doing video work, where I was able to travel a lot. I traveled almost all the countries in Europe and producing videos of different kinds.

And I got to the point where I had, I have an underlying health condition. And it got to the point where I couldn't work outside the home, basically. And I had to find ways that I could work from home, and in my own time, based on how I was feeling at the time. So I couldn't do anything where I could really commit to something on an ongoing basis, because it was just so variable. And so I needed to find something I could do on my own terms. And I tried a few different things.

But in the process, I came across online courses, I was taking them myself, and eventually the penny dropped. And I was like, I couldn't make an online course. And I thought about what I could do. And obviously video production was an obvious choice. Because I think one of the things as course creators, we tend to not necessarily see what's the most obvious choice, we think, try to think of stuff. And then it's like, actually, the thing we're most familiar with is the best way to go.

So I just was like, "Okay, okay, I can teach video. So who could I teach that video to?" And being in the space that I was in, I was like, "There's a lot of other course creators putting courses out there, some of them are great, some of them are not so great." And if I could help other course creators who may be struggling in the same way that I was, needing to work from home for whatever reason, then that would be great. I could help them and I could have the revenue that I could sustain from working from home.

Jeremy Deighan
Awesome. Yeah, that's a great way of going about it. I think, as you said, many people neglect what's right in front of us all the time. I've struggled this with myself, I'm always trying to teach some esoteric software that I just learned about instead of the things I'm actually good at.

So very good. So you were already taking courses, so you were kind of familiar with them and how they worked. And obviously you saw good ones and bad ones and then decided to teaching, start teaching yourself. What did that early, those early days look like? What, where were you posting your courses? How were you delivering that to your students? What did the beginning phase of that look like?

Demelza Marie
Well, I did it all wrong. So I think as a course creator, we tend to think, "I'll create a course and then I'll sell it." And so that's what I did. I created a course in a vacuum. I didn't look at any, I didn't interact with any of my ideal clients. And I just thought this is what I know. This is what I'm just going to put in the course. I just did a brain dump. And I, in quote, "Launched it." And literally no one showed up. I mean, my mum did. Yay for mothers, but no one showed up to my webinar and no one bought. And obviously, it was a very disappointing experience, I put a lot of time and effort into that course.

But the problem was, I went about it entirely wrong. So I hadn't built an audience, I hadn't built a relationship with my ideal clients to know exactly what they needed. And in the process of picking up the pieces. I have built an audience. I know what they're wanting now. I've been able to create a course that specifically meets a course creator's needs.

I just host it on the platform, I host it on New Zenler. And, yeah, I just deliver it as an online course that people can take in their own time. So that they can apply it, whether they want to watch the course entirely and then apply it or whether they want to do little bits and pieces and build up their production as they go.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, cool. Yeah, I think that that is a trap that most of us fall into, is we hear about courses, we get excited, and we spend all this time creating, and then realize that there's no one out there willing to buy it from us. So I want to get into some video strategies and techniques and different things like that. But before we do, let's just talk a minute about finding that audience because, you know, that's a pretty difficult process in itself. Once you realize that, no one was coming to your course, how did you go about actually getting your name out there and your brand and your business and drawing an audience in so that you could then sell to them?

Demelza Marie
Okay, I use two different strategies, primarily. One was YouTube. So I chose YouTube, basically, as my main content strategy. I think there's three, YouTube, podcasting and blogging. And obviously, with video, it made sense for me to choose YouTube. Plus, it's a search engine, which is also great. So that's where I've put out my authority content, if you like to establish myself as somebody who knows what they're talking about.

And then to build my community, I've chosen to use Facebook. And so I've been building a Facebook group. And again, just posting the YouTube videos in there. But also, I would do lives, I would post different posts, and I will engage with people in DMs. And that has really helped to build relationships in a way that helps me to move my business forward. But also just to help me know as well, who my audience is and what they need most.

Jeremy Deighan
Yeah, that's wonderful. I personally love this type of strategy myself, because I feel like the content, you know, your YouTube channel is important. And then the community is important, because you have those direct relationships with people where you can really talk to them, which you can kind of do through YouTube comments, but it's not the same. So having that Facebook group is important. And I love this, especially the fact that you just chose one of each, you didn't try to, you know, do a ton of different social media and be everywhere, a blog and a podcast. I think a lot of people fall into that trap also, would you agree with that?

Demelza Marie
Absolutely. And I have definitely been tempted that way, I've just found that I could never keep it up. So I had an Instagram account. I was just like, you know what, I'm gonna let it go. And I'll get to that eventually. But I figured right now I just need to focus on these two platforms, and I can expand later.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, and then what kind of content were you publishing on YouTube to grow your audience? And specifically, what I would like to ask you is, how do you tell the difference between what you're going to put on your YouTube channel versus say what you're going to put in your online course?

Demelza Marie
Okay, so on my YouTube channel, a lot of it's how to content in the sense of just very small little bits of how to do something very specific. I've also expanded a little bit. So while my main content initially was just on video related things, I have learned a lot in terms of the course creation process. So I feel like I have an experience and expertise that can be a lot broader than just video. So I include some of those things on the channel as well, because ultimately, some of those topics are going to draw people into my world, and then they will benefit from the video production things as well.

So in terms of the contents, the course is a lot more practical in terms of it shows you exactly what to do in terms of how to do it and the process and everything set up whereas the YouTube channels is you know, here's a tip here, here's a tip there, here's a strategy there. So it's all a bit hit and miss, you can get a lot of the content on my YouTube channel. But it's going to be harder to actually, and longer, for you to actually put it into process, into practice.

Jeremy Deighan
Great answer, I hope that helps some people out there. I know a lot of people get hung up on that, that, "Oh, I'm afraid to publish content on YouTube, because it's already in my course." And that can actually stop a lot of people. And I like what you said, it just, it really gives you a more streamlined version of how to take in the information versus trying to piece it together.

Demelza Marie
Exactly.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay. Very good. So, and just to continue on this for one more moment when people are coming to your YouTube channel, or maybe they're watching your Facebook Lives in the community, where are you directing them at that point? Are you sending them straight to a course landing page? Or are you using some kind of lead magnet or opt in to gather that audience into an email list?

Demelza Marie
Normally, I use a an opt in to draw people into my email list, I feel like I don't want to shove the course into people's faces. So I want to build that relationship and take them on the journey and help them to build that know, like, and trust factor, basically. And when I then present the course, a little bit later, they're more likely to buy because they've already built a connection, there's been more trust built.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, and what type of lead magnets are you using? Have you found any to be better than others, like checklists versus a video versus a mini course? What, which ones have you been using that you've found success with?

Demelza Marie
I think for me, the method I've gone with is I've looked at the, I've used my Facebook group to ask questions when people enter into the group and looking at the main categories that people struggle with. So I've identified about three categories, or sorry, about six categories, I think it is, that most people have. That either falls into equipment, they want to know what kind of equipment to use. They want to produce quality videos, or they want to feel more confident on camera. They want to maximize their time producing videos, because it just takes so long, or they want to edit easier or faster or something along those lines. I don't know how many that is, five?

So basically, I have a lead magnet for each of those different categories. And then I use whichever is the most relevant lead magnet with whatever content I'm sharing, or if I'm engaging with people in my Facebook group, and I'm asking them, you know, what's your biggest challenge? It generally fits into one of these topics. And then I'll basically say, "Hey, you know, I've got a free offer you can take advantage of and send them in that direction."

Jeremy Deighan
That's awesome. It's wild listening to you mention this, because I just recently did something similar, where I was taking the pains and problems of my audience and creating a couple of different lead magnets to address those. So I love that, because then you, you don't have just kind of a generic lead magnet, you have something that really addresses the concerns of that person. What what type of lead magnets do you use? Is it a PDF or video or...

Demelza Marie
Most of them are PDFs. The only one that has a video is the Confident On Camera, I have a video that leads into that. And that leads into a challenge, which is basically an online course. But all the others are PDFs which they can use for, for reference.

Jeremy Deighan
When you say a challenge to an online course, is the challenge a course, or are you saying that goes from a challenge in to your course?

Demelza Marie
Yeah, that's confusing. So the course is a challenge. It's called the Confidence On Camera Challenge and it's actually quite gamified in the sense that, it's like a mixture between Treasure Island and Mission Impossible. Basically, I've got a map of an island and you're going to rescue your ideal client and it, the first three modules are boot camp if you like. To learn everything you need to do in order to go and rescue your ideal client. And then the tasks, module four is practice and tasks to help you to actually put into practice everything you've just learned.

Jeremy Deighan
Oh, that's awesome. That sounds really cool. Now this is, this is a free challenge?

Demelza Marie
No, it is a course. But it's one of my cheaper courses.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, gotcha. So this is just kind of a more low end offer to get people in and then move them into your bigger main course?

Demelza Marie
Yeah.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, cool. That's awesome. Yeah, I really like that strategy. And gamification has been, become a little more popular lately. I've actually interviewed some people on the podcast with gamification strategies. And it's exciting to hear that you're using that also in your challenge. Are you finding good results from doing that, giving people objectives to complete? And are you rewarding them in any way?

Demelza Marie
So this is, just literally come out. So I haven't really got enough feedback to, to answer on that question because I had a different version before this. But the reward, I have a private Facebook group, which people can post their videos into. Because I think if someone is struggling with feeling confident on camera, then they don't necessarily want to post their videos publicly yet.

So we have a private group where they can basically practice and in that group, because we got this map, which you check off, once you've gone through your tasks, and that kind of thing, you can post pictures of you with your map, and in there, your progress or your completion or anything like that. But there's no prizes, per se. Other than be able to actually say that you're more confident.

Jeremy Deighan
Well, it you know, it's wild, because people just love, you know, competition and being held accountable. And that's a prize in itself. Just the fact that they get to post those maps and get feedback from other students and congratulations. I think that that's, that's amazing.

Demelza Marie
Yep.

Jeremy Deighan
So let's go ahead and shift the direction now to more of the video side of things, especially thinking about maybe some of the beginners out there who haven't created a course or maybe it's their first course, and they haven't got the video thing down real well. I would like to talk about the importance of production quality, and how far someone should go with that. Because I have personally struggled myself with perfectionism and making sure that everything is the best that it can be and probably going way too far than I should have. So could you take a moment and just kind of give me your thoughts on where is that fine line of having good video quality, where you're going to keep someone interested, versus you're taking it too far and spending too much time tweaking and editing?

Demelza Marie
Well, I think is, you know, creators, as educators, we tend to be very perfectionist, in our approach. I can identify with what you're saying. But I think in terms of a course business, done is better than perfect. And if it's going to delay you from getting something out there, then it's not actually helping you. Because ultimately, if I just refer back to my original story, I spent, I don't know how many hours. It was a long time, while I was pregnant, producing a course, which no one has ever seen.

Jeremy Deighan
Oh, no.

Demelza Marie
So my point is, when you, I mean, kudos to me, I actually went ahead and I did it and I moved forward. But to avoid spending a lot of time producing a course that nobody sees for example, is more important to take some important steps. Like first of all, validate your course idea and make sure it's working, and that the content is going to be something that people want. Because if you don't do that, then you can spend a lot of time with production, and nobody sees it.

When it comes to having done all of that. And now you're ready to actually produce the course or redo the course in a more professional way. I think again, there's just some key things that you need to take into account. And as long as those aspects are there, it doesn't have to be like this highly produced thing that we see that, you know, the multimillionaires are making. We as the regular Joe's, you know, we can't compete with that unless we got like super amount of money, but you don't need to. The point is we want to be authentic and connect with our students. And as long as we're doing that, and there's nothing distracting from that accomplishing that purpose. That is the main thing.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, very good. So just really connecting with them on a level of just providing them with good value, is that what do you mean?

Demelza Marie
Yeah, so I think sometimes when we are on camera, we tend to lose a sense of self and authenticity and just being natural. We tend to put on a, you know, a camera persona or whatever. And I think that can not come across as well as just being yourself and just like talking to a friend over coffee. You know, we connect better with that person, they feel more authentic. And we like them, we trust them. And as long as I said that the production value isn't distracting from the content of the message that you're sharing, that's the important thing. And there's some very simple things that you can do to make sure that doesn't happen. It doesn't have to be terribly complicated.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, yeah, let's talk about what are, what are some things that we can do on camera to have that authenticity come across?

Demelza Marie
Sure. Well, one of the things is the camera angle. I think very often, we don't think about the camera angle and sense of how it appears to people when we're looking down at a webcam, for example. So if we're using a laptop, we're often looking down at the webcam, which is not a very good angle for us. It emphasizes any double chins, which we probably don't want. And it also means that our audience is often looking up our noses. And it's just not a very good angle either way. And a good way to fix that is just to raise up your laptop a little bit so that your camera is eye level. Because if you're at eye level, you're on a peer with your student, and you're able to connect with them.

Again, if your camera is very high up, so you've got a big screen and the cameras, you're looking up at the camera, that means your students are looking down at you and subconsciously, you know, that's not necessarily a psychologically great way to build that connection, because you want to be the authority. And if they're looking down on you, that might affect that a little bit. So, again, like I said, look for ways in which you can be at eye level with your camera, or you could have it just slightly above, because that tends to be more flattering. But you definitely don't want it too low or too high, which is a mistake that I see a lot of people make.

Jeremy Deighan
Yeah, that's always, it's always fun to watch someone, the bottom of someone's face.

Demelza Marie
Exactly.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, cool. So, so raising the camera angle is one way that we can kind of get on a level with our students. And that's great, because, you know, it's, you have to remember that there's someone on the other side of that screen. And if you're talking eye level with them, like you said, you're on a peer to peer level, and they'll probably be more receptive to taking in the information.

What are some other things that we can do? What about, like, actually getting on camera and having that confidence? I know this is a big hurdle for people, is they get shy. They don't know really how to talk, or they stumble through their words, and they don't have what we call camera confidence. Can you give us some tips on how someone can overcome that?

Demelza Marie
Yeah, sure. I think one of the biggest things is to take your focus off yourself and make sure it's on your student, because once we take the focus off ourselves, then the pressure is off. And we don't think about all the things that we don't like about ourselves, like our voice or the way we look or you know, am I going to say the right thing. Because if you are focused on your student and giving them the best value, then you're going to talk to them just like you would in a natural conversation. And you're going to be able to deliver a lot more value, and it's going to be a lot more natural and feel better for you.

But if you're thinking about yourself and how you looking, you know, worried about all the different things that we worry about, then you're going to be not coming across as naturally and you're going to inhibit the value that you could be delivering.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, yeah, very good. I know for myself that doing those Facebook lives, like you mentioned earlier has kind of helped me with this. And I feel pretty confident, I've done plenty of courses now, I don't mind talking, but I still have that hiccup of, I don't look right, or my hair's messed up, or the background isn't perfect, you know? And so, I found Facebook lives has helped me with that because I, I just hop on and wherever I am, however I look, I just start talking. Would you agree?

Demelza Marie
Absolutely. I think Facebook lives are really helpful for just pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone and actually getting something done. I think, you know, as far as I'm concerned, I definitely prefer a pre-produced videos. I feel very confident talking to the camera for my courses or for YouTube videos or anything like that. It's no big deal for me now.

But talking live on Facebook is actually more intimidating for me at least. Because it's like, you can't do a redo. You can't be like, "Oh, let's do another take." It's like no, it came out wrong. I've got to just carry on and I think that can be good in terms of what we were talking about earlier in terms of the perfectionism. Just being able to be like, "Okay, it's good enough, as long as I'm delivering the content, and I'm offering value, that is the most important thing."

And obviously, if we know that we're coming across well, in terms of, we look good, we know the angles of the camera are good, we know the lighting looks good, we know the audio is good, all of those are going to increase our confidence as well. So it's definitely helpful to know, the different strategies and tools you can use to make sure that you're coming across while on camera. Because ultimately, that's going to boost your confidence too.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, cool. Awesome. Yeah, that that sounds great. And I feel like it goes back to the authenticity, like you mentioned that, you know, if you're on there, and you're just being real, and you're providing good content, as you said, people are going to appreciate that.

Demelza Marie
Absolutely.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, let's talk about, more about the equipment now. So someone who's kind of starting out, and maybe they can't invest into a big budget. We'll start with, let's say, the beginners who don't have much of a budget, and we just need to get them started. And then we'll talk about some more advanced stuff that you might recommend.

So starting with the beginners, what is some equipment that can really get someone started? I know that when you start getting into this world, you're worried about the cameras and the microphones and the lighting. What are some of the bare minimums that you feel that you need to have to produce good video content, but without, you know, investing into a $2,000 DSLR, and so forth?

Demelza Marie
So obviously, like I've mentioned before, it's actually the principles of good video rather than the equipment. So as long as you know, for example, keep the camera at eye level, make sure you're facing the light. So don't use the overhead lights, don't have backlighting or anything like that. Or certainly don't have lighting from below, like having a table lamp or something. What you want to make sure is if you're facing the light, you know that you're going to look good, and people can see you. And that's really important. So don't put the window behind you, for example.

You also want to have a quiet environment because people tolerate bad video more than they tolerate bad sound. So in terms of equipment, I would say potentially, the only investment you might want to make right up front is an external microphone. Because you can use your phone to record good videos, presumably, you know that that's assuming you have a smartphone, which produces, you know, HD video, but you could just use your phone. And that's something that you're already familiar with. So you don't have to worry about the learning curve in terms of how to use a DSLR, for example. So use that, that's absolutely fine. I used that for my first course. And they were great.

Like I said, you want to get a microphone, you can get a lavaliere mic, or lapel is what they sometimes call them as well. Or you could use a shotgun microphone, or a studio microphone. I'm actually using a studio microphone right now in order to record this podcast. And this is great if you're going to be doing computer based courses, where you're going to be sharing your screen more, or you're wanting to do Facebook lives or coaching or any of those kinds of things. So studio mic is great, just plug straight into computer with USB.

But if you're talking directly to the camera, then you might want to use a shotgun microphone, which is basically the one that kind of sticks out on top and points directly at you. Because that's a great camera, it means you're not hooked up with cables, which is the disadvantage to the lavalier mic or the lapel mic, because you then have cable, so you've got to hide and that kind of thing. Incidentally, in order to hide the lapel mic, feed it underneath your shirt, and then just clip the very top of it to your collar of your shirt. And then you don't have wires hanging down, which is not so great.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, and the lavaliere or the lapel mic is the little mic you see whenever it's like clipped to someone's jacket or their shirt?

Demelza Marie
Yep, that's right.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay and when would you want to use a microphone like that one versus the studio or the shotgun microphone.

Demelza Marie
If you're going to be doing anything where you're looking away from the camera, so for example, the shotgun microphone is great if you're looking at the camera, but if you look away, then it's not going to pick up your voice. So if you're going to be demonstrating something or you're moving around, I would choose a lapel mic because then it's always right beneath your mouth and it's going to pick up good sound wherever you are, regardless of what orientation you are to the camera.

Jeremy Deighan
Okay, cool. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. So whenever someone is getting started with creating video and choosing the equipment and getting going, what are some of those mistakes that you often see the beginners make over and over? If you could teach everyone right now in a couple minutes, the biggest mistakes that someone makes in the beginning and how to overcome them. What would that be?

Demelza Marie
Well, first one would be, like I said, bad camera angle. Another thing in terms of camera angles is to make sure, think about what's in your background. Because a distracting background is also very amateur in terms of if there's things lying around, or, you know, whatever, it just doesn't look very good. And one of the things you might want to look out for is mergers, which is basically anything that looks like it's sticking out of your head, or sticking out of your body in some way, because that's very distracting. And the camera has a harder time differentiating between dimension. So it doesn't necessarily see that there's two or three feet between you and whatever is behind you. And they will kind of put them all together and it makes it look weird.

So think about when you're looking in your lens, look around you, make sure that there's nothing sticking out of your body or you know, you've got a flowerpot sticking on your head or whatever it might be. Because like I said, that would be distracting. And if you can brand, your background, that's even better. Because if you can brand, your background with, like things that would relate to your topic. So for example, I have camera lenses, flashes, cameras, I have a clapper board, all of these kinds of things back up my content, in terms of, I teach video production. And if you can think about whatever your topic is, and put some of those elements into your background, that's going to reinforce the messaging that you're communicating. And again, branding colors, all of those kinds of things can can really help.

Jeremy Deighan
Yeah, I've really appreciate the branding you've done because I feel like you've done an amazing job on your website, your video content, your group, everything just kind of goes together. And you know that that's your brand. And it it really does emphasize your brand awareness and your authority.

Demelza Marie
Absolutely. And, you know, in terms of wanting to come across as professional, someone who has a consistent brand across all these different platforms is going to come across more professional than someone who's a bit hit and miss.

Jeremy Deighan
Right. Okay, so I know that, you know, we have a lot of beginners who listen to this podcast, and they're kind of getting started. But there's also a lot of people who listen that are advanced, and they've you know, created, maybe a couple courses already. Are there any advanced techniques or any tricks, or anything, strategies that you could talk about regarding equipment or video or being on camera that could really take someone from a beginner level to the next level?

Demelza Marie
Yeah, so I've recently upgraded my set, if you like. And I am now using a more complex setup. Now obviously, this costs a little bit more because you need more equipment, but it really makes a big difference in my opinion. And it makes it a whole lot easier to record as well, especially if you're doing lives or Zoom calls.

So basically, what I would recommend if you are in this stage is to get a teleprompter, and a camera monitor, and a few cables and things like that. And basically what you want to do is you can connect the camera monitor to your camera, so you can see what's on your camera screen. Put that monitor on the teleprompter, and then basically you can see yourself in the teleprompter. That means that you can look directly at the lens and you can see yourself on camera, because I think sometimes we, this is another mistake, we're tempted to look at the selfie screen and talk to the selfie screen rather than the lens. And of course our audience is the other side of the lens, not the selfie screen. So very often it's helpful for us to get that feedback.

So by putting the monitor directly in front of the camera lens by placing it just under the, in the teleprompter slot if you like, it means that you can see yourself and make sure everything's coming across well, but without looking at a selfie screen. And then what you can do if you have the full setup is you can connect it to your computer and use a little switch and then you can switch between what the camera sees and what your computer sees. Now the benefit to this is, if you can see what your computer sees, and you can put it to your monitor, and then broadcast it up onto the screen right in front of your camera lens. That means you can do your Facebook lives, so you can do your Zoom calls where you see people and have coaching calls and you're having conversations with people, you can talk directly to them and still be looking directly at the lens.

Jeremy Deighan
That is amazing. I have thought about this myself before. I travel now and so I can't take a whole studio with me. I have my whole business in a backpack pretty much. But back at our old house, I had started building a studio and I thought about the same thing that you're talking about because I was thinking to myself, if I got an iPad or laptop and I could project it into the teleprompter, then I could do what you're saying, which is see Facebook comments and see the people you're talking to without having to look away. So that's, that's a great piece of advice. I really like that.

So yeah, that's, that's awesome. Time goes so quickly on these interviews. I wish we could talk for hours, because I have so many more questions. But I would like to go ahead and wrap up by just asking you, you know, you've started this journey. And in the beginning, you didn't see a lot of success. And now you're growing your audience, you're finding success, you're building up that email list and selling your course. Where would you like to see your business going forward in the future? How would you like to help out more, given the chance to do everything that you'd like to do?

Demelza Marie
Yeah, so I'm obviously still in the process of building out my business model. There's a lot that goes into it in terms of funnels, and webinars, and obviously, the different courses for different stages and that kind of thing. So I'd like to go ahead and finish building all of that out so that I can serve everyone at the different stages best. And just to be able to scale everything so that more people know that this opportunity exists to help them with production and course creation as a whole. Because I think the experience that I have had over the last nearly four years now in course creation, and also in video production is a good marriage, to being able to help those who are getting started and want to create a course, that will not bomb right away. But we'll go ahead and hopefully make them some money a lot quicker than it did for me.

Jeremy Deighan
So thinking about that person who is starting this journey. And going back to your early days, what is one piece of advice that you would like to give the listener out there who hasn't created a course yet, and they're thinking about doing that?

Demelza Marie
Well I've got two if that's okay, so one would be, if you have the money, invest in a mentor, because that will ultimately save you a lot of money, trying to figure it all out by yourself. And a lot of time trying to figure it all by yourself, because there's so much to learn. It's not just create a course and people will buy it. So I would invest in a mentor who can guide you through the process. If you don't have the money for that right now, then I would look into finding somebody who has done what you want to do and look at any courses or offers that they have that you can follow in a in a free sense.

And then the other thing is, make sure you're building your audience because one of the things I made a mistake was, I was thinking I can't build a course and build my audience at the same time and I picked building the course instead of building the audience. I would recommend doing it the other way around and build your audience and do a beta with your audience and make sure that your content is going to sell before you spend hours and lots of hours and lots of money potentially, actually creating the course that no one ends up buying.

Jeremy Deighan
Perfect. Those are some great answers, some great tips and advice that you've given us today. And I just appreciate you for coming on the show and sharing this wealth of knowledge with everyone. If people want to find out more about you and your business, where can they do that?

Demelza Marie
I would just go ahead and check out the website which is DemelzaMarie.com. And everything, all the latest offers will be there in terms of how I can best help you with your journey.

Jeremy Deighan
Perfect. Well thank you so much, Demelza for coming on the show today. And I just wish you the most success in the future.

Demelza Marie
Thank you so much. I really appreciate it.

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